Frisch & Co. News
» Shorter Days reviewed at My Book Strings

“This is not a book about scratching on the surface of people’s lives; it’s about tearing down the entire façade and exposing what is—and is not—behind it.”

You can read the rest of the review here

» Meet the Translator: Mike Mitchell

How did you become a literary translator?
“Literature was one of my main interests at school and I enjoyed translating from then onwards (just for myself). I taught German at university for 30 years; one attempt to get a book translated in the early 70s brought such a discouraging response from John Calder that I and a colleague, who was to edit it, just dropped it. However, by chance a US professor I’d written articles and a couple of chapters for decided to set up a publishing house for Austrian literature, culture etc and asked if I’d like to do a translation for them (Ariadne). I jumped at the chance.”

You can read the rest of the interview here.

» The Telegraph reviews Tellkamp's The Tower

“On November 9 it will be 25 years to the day that the Berlin Wall came down. Published in English for the first time to coincide with that anniversary is The Tower, a 2008 novel by Uwe Tellkamp, who grew up in the former East Germany. It follows a Dresden family in the years before 1989, reconstructing the trials of everyday life in the German Democratic Republic, portrayed without nostalgia as a hyper-bureaucratic police state, farcical and sinister.”

You can read the rest of the review here.

» Tony Malone on Family Heirlooms

Family Heirlooms is a rather short work, almost a one-sitting book, and fairly easy to read, but there’s a lot more going on under the surface than appears at first glance . . . it’s certainly a story which makes you think.”

You can read the rest of the review here.

» Talking With Animals/Speech Without Words: Review of Han Dong’s A Tabby-cat’s Tale

“Han Dong’s Tabby may not be the stereotypical hero, but he nevertheless derives from a line of similar characters in literary history. The author’s portrayal of Tabby fits quite nicely alongside the hilarious and often eyebrow-raising wit J.R. Ackerley employs in My Dog Tulip . . . In Han Dong’s story, separated by thirty-five years and seven thousand miles, we meet Tulip’s soul mate, a cat named Tabby that lives and dies on a seventh floor apartment in Nanjing, China.”

You can read the rest of Melissa Armstrong’s review here.

» Why I Publish Ebooks, or the Future of Literary Translation

It so happens that I’ve been publishing literature in translation for a few years, almost ten by now, and as with all other kinds of book publishing pursuits, though it’s made for a pleasant sort of life, it’s been a struggle—whether in trying to succeed with translated books at a larger publisher, finding allies in the internal, and eternal, fight for institutional attention, or at a smaller publisher, where simply maintaining forward momentum, feeling as though you can afford to continue to publish next month’s or next season’s books, let alone have the resources to find the readers your writers deserve, can feel like an overwhelming task. . .

 
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