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"A weird mandala of despair slowly rotating on the page."Scott Beauchamp, Full Stop

Cetarti spends his days in a cloud of pot smoke, watching nature documentaries on television. A call from a stranger, informing him that his mother and brother have been murdered, finally tears him from his lethargy: he must identify the bodies. After making sure he has enough pot for the trip, he sets out to the remote Argentinian village of Lapachito, an ominous place, where the houses are sinking deeper and deeper into the mud and a lurid, horrific sun is driving everyone crazy. When Duarte, a former military man turned dedicated criminal, ropes Cetarti into a scheme to cash in on his mother’s life insurance, events quickly spiral out of control. . .

A riveting, thrilling, and shocking read, Under This Terrible Sun paints the portrait of a civilization in terminal decline, where the border between reality and nightmare has become increasingly blurred.

Translated from Spanish by Megan McDowell
Published 18 June 2013
Originally published by Editorial Anagrama
~140 pages, 978-0-989-12671-7

"To say that Carlos Busqued’s debut novel Under This Terrible Sun presents a bleak landscape is as misleading as it is true. It’s misleading because though the book contains its share of literal wastelands . . . they are just the thin outward layer of desolation that pervades the entire world the book portrays. Take what you see on face value and you’re liable to miss the novel’s chilling unity." —Michael Stein, BODY

"There is a latent primal energy that courses just beneath the surface, but never actually breaks through. . . It's a harrowing journey." —The Indiscriminate Critic

"Aside from the train wreck like inescapability of it all, the rubber necking that you take part in as a reader, the realization that as much as you want to you can’t look away, you can’t put down the book, you must keep turning the pages to see what happens next, even though you know it’s going to ruin you emotionally, as if you need more, a big part of what makes Under This Terrible Sun work so effectively is that Busqued refuses to let you escape the grasp of his chosen subjects for even a single second." —Aaron Westerman, The Typographical Era

Carlos Busqued was born in the northern Argentinian province of Chaco in 1970. He has produced the radio programmes Vidas Ejemplares, El otoño en Pekín and Prisionero del Planeta Infierno; and he contributes to the magazine El Ojo Con Dientes. He currently lives in Buenos Aires. Under This Terrible Sun is his first novel.

News about Carlos Busqued
» Portland Book Review on Under This Terrible Sun

“Equally part stoner manifesto, part mystery/thriller, part psycho-physiological novel, and part poetry, Under This Terrible Sun is an exciting and morbid ride…”

You can read the rest of the review here.

» Stu Allen on Under This Terrible Sun

“I was reminded of the later Pynchon book like inherent vice involves figures like this at the edge of life ,stoners ,chancers all feature in this book .I also felt the porn section remind me of films like 8mm, where we open the door on the extremes of human nature ,very hard to read and eye-opening but this world exists and we are shown how vile it can be by this book .”

You can read the rest of the review here.

» Two Frisch & Co. books are Finalists for the 2013 Typographical Translation Award!

Anna Kim’s Anatomy of a Night and Carlos Busqued’s Under This Terrible Sun have both been selected as Finalists for the 2013 Typographical Translation Award. Voting is open to the public until December 19th, so head on over and vote for your favorite now!

» Will Evans Reviews Under This Terrible Sun for Three Percent

“In any format, Under This Terrible Sun is a damn good read.”

» Michael Stein at B O D Y on Under This Terrible Sun

“To say that Carlos Busqued’s debut novel Under This Terrible Sun presents a bleak landscape is as misleading as it is true. It’s misleading because though the book contains its share of literal wastelands – desert highways, seemingly empty towns and isolated, rundown gas stations – they are just the thin outward layer of desolation that pervades the entire world the book portrays. Take what you see on face value and you’re liable to miss the novel’s chilling unity.”

» The Indiscriminate Critic Reviews Under This Terrible Sun

“To be frankly honest, this is not a comfortable book. In fact, there are moments of such utter depravity that I fear they may be forever burned into my memory. In some ways, I’m quite at a loss in trying to think of any redeeming qualities in the novel. Then again, sometimes we need a book that forces us to look into the abyss.”

» Under This Terrible Sun Reviewed at Tony's Reading List

“Carlos Busqued’s Under this Terrible Sun is a short, laconic and occasionally disturbing book.”

» Megan McDowell on translating Under This Terrible Sun @ Necessary Fiction

“I had an interesting experience, one that was a first for me, while working on Under This Terrible Sun: I came to a part that I couldn’t translate. Not because it was difficult or “untranslatable;” it was more that I physically couldn’t bring myself to do it, so strong was the feeling of disgust and aversion it provoked in me. I had to skip over this part and come back to it later, steeled. If by chance you’ve read the book, you know what part I’m talking about. (And if you haven’t read it, you want to now, right?) And after I did translate this part, it wasn’t over. I still had to edit it, I still had to read it out loud a couple times. I had to question my word choice and preposition use, adjectives and word order. I had to get into the scene. I’ve never before felt such visceral antipathy as I typed words, and I felt implicated.”

» Full Stop on Under This Terrible Sun: "A weird mandala of despair slowly rotating on the page."

“Like all good noir, there are crimes within crimes here. But what really makes the novel work, and what makes it worthy of our attention, is this central question of figuring out what is meaningful to us in such an amoral and capricious world. Weather, cars, fish, toy planes, elephants, pornography, weed, coffins, beetles, dreams, crosses — all threaten to weigh in with equally heavy importance, projecting a repetitive monotony of doom — a weird mandala of despair slowly rotating on the page.”

» By the Firelight reviews Under This Terrible Sun

“Carlos Busqued’s Under This Terrible Sun is a dark and at times disturbing book that in its tight and economical prose wastes little time in showing men at their worst. The cruelty is elusive at first. The novel opens with a description from a Discovery Channel show of the cannibalistic tendencies of squid. It is the first of many such descriptions of elusive giant squids. While they seem extraneous to the story, just so much TV background noise, they set the tone for the novel, as the mystery and the ruthless violence have their parallel within the novel.”

You can read the rest of the review here.

» Under This Terrible Sun excerpt on B O D Y

B O D Y has posted an excerpt from Carlos Busqued’s Under This Terrible Sun here.

» Typographical Era reviews Under This Terrible Sun

“Aside from the train wreck like inescapability of it all, the rubber necking that you take part in as a reader, the realization that as much as you want to you can’t look away, you can’t put down the book, you must keep turning the pages to see what happens next, even though you know it’s going to ruin you emotionally, as if you need more, a big part of what makes Under This Terrible Sun work so effectively is that Busqued refuses to let you escape the grasp of his chosen subjects for even a single second.”